Tag?: H.P. Lovecraft

The Mound—Part I

23 minute read

The works of H.P. Lovecraft are typically set in modern day (for him) New England. There are a few notable exceptions. One of them is The Mound co-written with Zelia Bishop, which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form (the final part scheduled to be published the week of Halloween). There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part II

20 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: Part 2 of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part III

29 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: Part 3 of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part IV

19 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: Part 4 of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part V

19 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: Part 5 of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part VI

18 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: Part 6 of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

The Mound—Part VII

18 minute read

There’s just something attractive to the idea of infinite cosmic horror and the wild, wild west: the conclusion of H.P. Lovecraft and Zelia Bishop’s “The Mound,” which we’re presenting here in 7-part serial form. — ed, N.E. Lilly

In the Walls of Eryx

60 minute read

In January of 1936 a young man named Kenneth Sterling shared a draft of a story with H.P. Lovecraft. The story was rewritten and published after Lovecraft’s death as In the Walls of Eryx in the Weird Tales of October 1939. This story is Lovecraft’s sole Interplanetary frontier story set in the future. It details an encounter of a prospector with the aborigines of the planet Venus. — ed, N.E. Lilly